More lazy values, the State monad and other stateful stuff

In the previous post, we talked about lazy evaluation in Scala. At the end of that post, we asked an interesting question: Does a Lazy value hold an state?

24195622

In order to answer that question, we’ll try to define a type that could represent the Lazy values:

trait Lazy[T] {

  val evalF : () => T

  val value: Option[T] = None

}
object Lazy{
  def apply[T](f: => T): Lazy[T] =
    new Lazy[T]{ val evalF = () => f }
}

As you can see, our Lazy type is parameterized by some T type that represents the actual value type(Lazy[Int] would be the representation for a lazy integer).
Besides that, we can see that it’s composed of the two main Lazy type features:

  • evalF : Zero-parameter function that, when its ‘apply’ method is invoked, it evaluates the contained T expression.
  • value : The result value of the interpretation of the evalF function. This concrete part denotes the state in the Lazy type, and it only admit two possible values: None (not evaluated) or Some(t) (if it has been already evaluated and the result itself).

We’ve also added a companion object that defines the Lazy instance constructor that receives a by-name parameter that is returned as result of the evalF function.

e9a2295b3db9b45c8f5484a09033c1c71cf88e3375bb7ff60456bc81c29a4e04

Now the question is, how do we join both the evaluation function and the value that it returns so we can make Lazy an stateful type? We define the ‘eval’ function this way:

trait Lazy[T] { lzy =>

  val evalF : () => T

  val value: Option[T] = None

  def eval: (T, Lazy[T]) = {
    val evaluated = evalF.apply()
    evaluated -> new Lazy[T]{ mutated =>
      val evalF = lzy.evalF
      override val value = Some(evaluated)
      override def eval: (T, Lazy[T]) = 
        evaluated -> mutated
    }
  } 

}

The ‘eval’ function returns a two-element tuple:

  • The value result of evaluating the expression that stands for the lazy value.
  • a new Lazy value version that contains the new state: the T evaluation result.

If you take a closer look, what ‘eval’ method does in first place is to invoke the evalF function so it can retrieved the T value that remained until that point not-evaluated.
Once done, we return it as well as the new Lazy value version. This new version (let’s call it mutated version) will have in its ‘value’ attribute the result of having invoked the evalF function. In the same way, we change its eval method, so in future invocations the Lazy instance itself is returned instead of creating new instances (because it actually won’t change its state, like Scala’s lazy definitions work).

The interesting question that comes next is: is this an isolated case? Could anything else be defined as stateful? Let’s perform an abstraction exercise.

Looking for generics: stateful stuff

Let’s think about a simple stack:

sealed trait Stack[+T]
case object Empty extends Stack[Nothing]
case class NonEmpty[T](head: T, tail: Stack[T]) extends Stack

The implementation is really simple. But let’s focus in the Stack trait and in a hypothetical pop method that pops an element from the stack so it is returned as well as the rest of the stack:

sealed trait Stack[+T]{
  def pop(): (Option[T], Stack[T])
}

Does it sound familiar to you? It is mysteriously similar to

trait Lazy[T]{
  def eval: (T, Lazy[T])
}

isn’t it?

If we try to re-factor for getting a common trait between Lazy and Stack, we could define a much more abstract type called State:

trait State[S,T]聽{
  def apply(s: S): (T, S)
}

Simple but pretty: the State trait is parameterized by two types: S (state type) and T (info or additional element that is returned in the specified state mutation). Though it’s simple, it’s also a ver common pattern when designing Scala systems. There’s always something that holds certain state. And everything that has an state, it mutates. And if something mutates in a fancy and smart way…oh man.

That already exists…

24314442

All this story that seems to be created from a post-modern essay, has already been subject of study for people…that study stuff. Without going into greater detail, in ScalaZ library you can find the State monad that, apart from what was previously pointed, is fully-equipped with composability and everything that being a monad means (semigroup, monoid, …).

If we define our Lazy type with the State monad, we’ll get something similar to:

import scalaz.State

type Lazy[T] = (() => T, Option[T])

def Lazy[T](f: => T) = (() => f, None)

def eval[T] = State[Lazy[T], T]{
  case ((f, None)) => {
    val evaluated = f.apply()
    ((f, Some(evaluated)), evaluated)
  }
  case s@((_, Some(evaluated))) => (s, evaluated) 
}

When decrypting the egyptian hieroglyph, given the State[S,T] monad, we have that our S state will be a tuple composed of what exactly represents a lazy expression (that we also previously described):

type Lazy[T] = (() => T, Option[T])
  • A Function0 that represents the lazy evaluation of T
  • The T value that might have been evaluated or not

For building a Lazy value, we generate a tuple with a function that stands for the expression pointed with the by-name parameter of the Lazy method; and the None value (because the Lazy guy hasn’t been evaluated yet):

def Lazy[T](f: => T) = (() => f, None)

Last, but not least (it’s actually the most important part), we define the only state transition that is possible in this type: the evaluation. This is the key when designing any State type builder: how to model what out S type stands for and the possible state transitions that we might consider.

In the case of the Lazy type, we have two possible situations: the expression hasn’t been evaluated yet (in that case, we’ll evaluate it and we’ll return the same function and the result) or the expression has been already evaluated (in that case we won’t change the state at all and we’ll return the evaluation result):

def eval[T] = State[Lazy[T], T]{
  case ((f, None)) => {
    val evaluated = f.apply()
    ((f, Some(evaluated)), evaluated)
  }
  case s@((_, Some(evaluated))) => (s, evaluated) 
}

iZcUNxH

In order to check that we can still count on the initial features we described for the Lazy type (it can only be evaluated once, only when necessary, …) we check the following assertions:

var sideEffectDetector: Int = 0

val two = Lazy {
  sideEffectDetector += 1
  2
}

require(sideEffectDetector==0)

val (_, (evaluated, evaluated2)) = (for {
  evaluated <- eval[Int]
  evaluated2 <- eval[Int]
} yield (evaluated, evaluated2)).apply(two)

require(sideEffectDetector == 1)
require(evaluated == 2)
require(evaluated2 == 2)

Please, do notice that, as we mentioned before, what is defined inside the for-comprehension are the same transitions or steps that the state we decide will face. That means that we define the mutations that any S state will suffer. Once the recipe is defined, we apply it to the initial state we want.
In this particular case, we define as initial state a lazy integer that will hold the 2 value. For checking the amount of times that our Lazy guy is evaluated, we just add a very dummy var that will be used as a counter. After that, we define inside our recipe that the state must mutate twice by ussing the eval operation. Afterwards we’ll check that the expression of the Lazy block has only been evaluated once and that the returning value is the expected one.

I wish you the best tea for digesting all this crazy story 馃檪
Please, feel free to add comments/menaces at the end of this post or even at our gitter channel.

See you on next post.
Peace out!

M谩s lazy’s, la m贸nada State y otras cosas con estado

En el anterior post habl谩bamos sobre la evaluaci贸n perezosa en Scala. Al final de dicho post, plante谩bamos una pregunta: 驴Un Lazy tiene estado?

24195622

Para responder a dicha pregunta, vamos a intentar definir un tipo que represente un valor Lazy como sigue:

trait Lazy[T] {

  val evalF : () => T

  val value: Option[T] = None

}
object Lazy{
  def apply[T](f: => T): Lazy[T] =
    new Lazy[T]{ val evalF = () => f }
}

Como se puede observar, nuestro tipo Lazy est谩 parametrizado por un tipo T que representa el tipo del valor en cuesti贸n(Lazy[Int] ser铆a la representaci贸n de un entero perezoso).
Adem谩s, podemos ver que se compone de dos elementos principales que caracterizan a un Lazy:

  • evalF : Funci贸n de cero argumentos que, al invocar su m茅todo apply, eval煤a la expresi贸n de T contenida.
  • value : El valor resultante de la interpretaci贸n de la funci贸n evalF. Esta parte es la que denota el estado en el tipo Lazy, y solo admite dos posibles valores: None (no evaluado) o Some(t) (si ya ha sido evaluado y el resultado obtenido).

Tambi茅n hemos a帽adido un objeto companion que define el constructor de instancias Lazy que recibe un argumento by-name que se devuelve como resultado de la funci贸n evalF.

e9a2295b3db9b45c8f5484a09033c1c71cf88e3375bb7ff60456bc81c29a4e04

La cuesti贸n ahora es: 驴C贸mo unimos la funci贸n de evaluaci贸n con el valor que devuelve para hacer que Lazy mantenga un estado? Definiendo la funci贸n eval:

trait Lazy[T] { lzy =>

  val evalF : () => T

  val value: Option[T] = None

  def eval: (T, Lazy[T]) = {
    val evaluated = evalF.apply()
    evaluated -> new Lazy[T]{ mutated =>
      val evalF = lzy.evalF
      override val value = Some(evaluated)
      override def eval: (T, Lazy[T]) = 
        evaluated -> mutated
    }
  } 

}

La funci贸n eval devuelve una tupla de dos elementos:

  • el valor resultante de la evaluaci贸n de la expresi贸n que representa el valor perezoso.
  • una nueva versi贸n del valor Lazy que contiene el nuevo estado: el resultado de la evaluaci贸n.

Si os fij谩is, lo que hace el m茅todo en primer lugar, es invocar a la funci贸n evalF para obtener el valor de tipo T que a煤n estaba sin evaluar.
Una vez hecho esto, lo devolvemos as铆 como la nueva versi贸n del elemento Lazy. Esta nueva versi贸n (llam茅mosla mutated) tendr谩 en su atributo value el resultado de haber invocado a evalF. Del mismo modo, modificamos su m茅todo eval, para que en sucesivas invocaciones se devuelva a s铆 mismo y no genere nueva instancias que en realidad no var铆an su estado.

La cuesti贸n interesante viene ahora: 驴es este un caso 煤nico? 驴Existen m谩s ‘cosas’ que mantienen un estado? Hagamos un ejercicio de abstracci贸n.

Buscando la genericidad: cosas-con-estado

Pensemos en el caso de una pila:

sealed trait Stack[+T]
case object Empty extends Stack[Nothing]
case class NonEmpty[T](head: T, tail: Stack[T]) extends Stack

La implementaci贸n sale casi sola. Pero centr茅monos en el trait Stack y en un hipot茅tico m茅todo pop que desapila un elemento que se devuelve junto al resto de la pila:

sealed trait Stack[+T]{
  def pop(): (Option[T], Stack[T])
}

驴Os suena de algo? 驴No se parece misteriosamente a

trait Lazy[T]{
  def eval: (T, Lazy[T])
}

…?

Si intentamos sacar factor com煤n entre Lazy y Stack podr铆amos definir un tipo mucho m谩s abstracto llamado State:

trait State[S,T]聽{
  def apply(s: S): (T, S)
}

Simple pero bello: el trait State est谩 parametrizado por dos tipos: S (tipo de estado) y T (informaci贸n o elemento adicional que devuelve cada vez que mutamos el estado). Aqu铆 donde lo veis, se trata de un patr贸n muy recurrente al dise帽ar sistemas en Scala. Siempre hay algo que mantiene un estado. Y todo lo que tiene estado muta. Y si ese algo muta de manera segura y elegante…oh man.

Esto ya existe …

21495586

Toda esta historia que parece sacada de un ensayo post-moderno, resulta que ya ha sido objeto de estudio de personas que estudian cosas. Sin entrar en mucho detalle, en la librer铆a ScalaZ pod茅is encontrar la m贸nada State que, adem谩s de lo descrito anteriormente, trae de serie un full-equipped de componibilidad y todo lo que conlleva ser M贸nada (semigrupo, monoide, etc).

Si definimos nuestro tipo Lazy con la m贸nada State tenemos algo como:

import scalaz.State

type Lazy[T] = (() => T, Option[T])

def Lazy[T](f: => T) = (() => f, None)

def eval[T] = State[Lazy[T], T]{
  case ((f, None)) => {
    val evaluated = f.apply()
    ((f, Some(evaluated)), evaluated)
  }
  case s@((_, Some(evaluated))) => (s, evaluated) 
}

Al descomponer el jerogl铆fico egipcio arriba expuesto, dada la m贸nada State[S,T], nuestro estado S va a ser una tupla de lo que representa en el fondo a una evaluaci贸n perezosa:

type Lazy[T] = (() => T, Option[T])

y que m谩s arriba hemos descrito:

  • Una Function0 que representa la evaluaci贸n demorada de T
  • El valor T que puede haberse evaluado o no

Para construir un valor Lazy, generamos una tupla con una funci贸n que recoge la expresi贸n indicada por un argumento by-name del m茅todo Lazy y el valor None (porque a煤n no ha sido evaluado el Lazy):

def Lazy[T](f: => T) = (() => f, None)

Por 煤ltimo (y esta es la parte importante) definimos la 煤nica transici贸n posible de estado que podemos concebir cuando hablamos de valores perezosos: la evaluaci贸n. Esta es la clave cuando dise帽amos cualquier constructor de tipos que extiende de State: lo importante es modelar qu茅 es nuestro tipo S y las transiciones de estado posibles.

Para el tipo Lazy, tenemos dos posibles casos: que la expresi贸n a煤n no haya sido evaluada (en cuyo caso la evaluamos y devolvemos la misma funci贸n y el resultado) 贸 que la expresi贸n ya haya sido evaluada (en cuyo caso dejamos el estado como est谩 y devolvemos adem谩s el resultado de la evaluaci贸n):

def eval[T] = State[Lazy[T], T]{
  case ((f, None)) => {
    val evaluated = f.apply()
    ((f, Some(evaluated)), evaluated)
  }
  case s@((_, Some(evaluated))) => (s, evaluated) 
}

iZcUNxH

Para comprobar que seguimos contando con las mismas caracter铆sticas iniciales para las que definimos el tipo Lazy (solo se eval煤a una vez, solo se eval煤a cuando es necesario, …) lanzamos las siguiente aserciones:

var sideEffectDetector: Int = 0

val two = Lazy {
  sideEffectDetector += 1
  2
}

require(sideEffectDetector==0)

val (_, (evaluated, evaluated2)) = (for {
  evaluated <- eval[Int]
  evaluated2 <- eval[Int]
} yield (evaluated, evaluated2)).apply(two)

require(sideEffectDetector == 1)
require(evaluated == 2)
require(evaluated2 == 2)

Si os fij谩is, como antes coment谩bamos, lo que se define en la for-comprehension son las transiciones o pasos que va a enfrentar el estado que nosotros queramos. Es decir, definimos las mutaciones que sufrir谩 un estado S cualquiera. Una vez definida la ‘receta’, la aplicamos al estado inicial que nosotros queramos.
En este caso, definimos como estado inicial un perezoso n煤mero entero dos. Para comprobar el n煤mero de veces que se eval煤a nuestro Lazy, a帽adimos un var muy dummy que funcionar谩 a modo de contador. Luego definimos en nuestra ‘receta’ que el estado debe mutar dos veces mediante la operaci贸n eval. Posteriormente comprobamos que solo se ha ejecutado una vez la expresi贸n del bloque Lazy y que el valor resultante de la expresi贸n es el esperado.

Os deseo la mejor de las sales de frutas para digerir todo esto 馃檪
Sent铆os libres de a帽adir comentarios/amenazas en el post o en nuestro canal de gitter.

Hasta el pr贸ximo post.
隆Agur de lim贸n!